New paper outlines ​an exciting new technology for remote-controlled drug release using biocompatible magnetic nanofibres

03 May 2018

An exciting new technology for remote-controlled drug release using biocompatible magnetic nanofibres, is reported in a new paper by CNIE's Ayomi Perera and Marc-Olivier Coppens.

An efficient method is reported, for fabrication of composite microfibers that can be magnetically actuated and are biocompatible, targeting controlled drug release. Aqueous solutions of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), incorporated with citric acid coated Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), are subject to infusion gyration, to generate 100-300 nm diameter composite fibers, with controllable MNP loading.The fibers are stable in polar solvents, such as ethanol, and do not show any leaching of MNPs for over 4 weeks.

Using acetaminophen as an example, the authors demonstrate that, this material is effective in immobilization and triggered release of drugs, achieved by a moving external magnetic field. The remote actuation ability, coupled with biocompatibility and lightweight property, renders enormous potential for these fibers to be used as a smart drug-release agent.

The new paper titled, 'Polymer–Magnetic Composite Fibers for Remote-Controlled Drug Release', has been published in the Journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

Authors: Ayomi S. Perera, Siqi Zhang, Shervanthi Homer-Vanniasinkam, Marc-Olivier Coppens, and Mohan Edirisinghe.

Click here to read the paper

New paper outlines ​an exciting new technology for remote-controlled drug release using biocompatible magnetic nanofibres